Author: Nobilis Reed

frostlawyer:

have you ever brought up a topic like ableism or misogyny or cissexism around people you love and trust and just seen the boredom and exasperation and ‘here we go again’ in their eyes and suddenly felt a little bit less safe

No, because I almost never hang around with people who are bored or exasperated with such discussions, and they’re almost never people I love and trust. On the rare occasion that happens, I don’t feel any less safe, because in my circles those people are the ones who end up feeling less safe for revealing bigoted or hateful opinions.

(via lifeislikeabadrpg)

Source: frostlawyer

"It’s absurd to me that we as a culture agree it’s terribly rude to talk about last nights’ Game of Thrones without a spoiler alert, but trigger warnings for the benefit of people with PTSD are an imposition too far."

This makes a good deal of sense to me.

The only comment I would add, is that generally speaking we can all agree on what a spoiler is for last night’s Game of Thrones episode, whereas I don’t think a consensus is easily reached for what might be a trigger for a very widely varied community of PTSD sufferers.

(via thehumanarkle)

Source: cinematicnomad
“What’s between the covers should matter to a reader, not what’s between my legs.”
geekgirlvideo:

As a follow up to the Doubleclick’s powerful “Nothing to Prove”, I wanted to talk a bit about the sign I submitted (1:40).
 Firstly, I like both this song and video not because they are “anti-“ or “against” this fake geek girl nonsense, but because the whole song and vibe of the video are more of a Oh, c’mon. Give your head a shake. You’re being so silly. It’s not a push back, or an attack, or a scream so much as it’s a palm to the forehead and raised eyebrow and a “Did that really just come out of your mouth? Really? ‘Fake Geek Girls’? Do you maybe wanna… think about what you just said?”
 Secondly, my sign:
 “I have to use a gender-neutral pen name to be respected.”
 So here’s the story: I’m a science fiction and fantasy author. Most people automatically assume that as a Caucasian female (cis-female, identifying/presenting female, bisexual) writer, that means I write Middle Grade or Young Adult fiction. When they learn that I generally write for the Adult market they assume Romance or Erotica. When I write genre books, then the next assumption is Urban Fantasy, Dystopian, or Magical Fantasy – fairies, princesses, dragons, like that.
 When I explain that no, I write Science Fiction mostly, the next reaction is usually “Oh, but that fluff stuff, right, no real science?”
 Which… WTF?
 What, I can’t science because I’m a girl?
 Leaving aside the fact that no, actually, I don’t write a lot of hard science fiction because I find the science-telling often gets in the way of the story-telling. (That’s not to say that what science I do include in my books isn’t rigorously researched. I have a military advisor, a historical architecture advisor, two historians, an ex-military dude, a NASA physicist, a biologist, and a poisons expert in my roster.) But the implication is there:
 I’m a girl and therefore I can’t science.
 (People often conveniently forget writers like Julie Czerneda, a bonefide biologist, or Erin Bow who worked at CERN.)
 The implication of these conversations is that I’m a girl and therefore I have to write books for kids about princesses getting rescued, and unicorns, and fairies with rainbow wings that vomit bubbles. Or ‘trashy’ romance books. (Which… I hate that stereotype. Romance books are never trashy or worthless.)
 Now, there are lots of lovely MG, YA, NA, Romance, Erotica, Urban Fantasy, Dystopian, Magical Fantasy writers out there of all genders and sexual inclinations –I’m not harping on those writers. They write what they enjoy, I write what I enjoy, and it’s okay! I prefer to write Social Science Fiction. What I’m harping on is the assumption that I can’t write “real” science fiction because I have ladyparts. (Instead of getting into the false assumption that “Accurate” = “hard” = “good” science fiction writing, I’ll just link you to my article on such.)
 And that assumption also ends up playing out in such a way that female science fiction writers just don’t get the respect from the readers that male ones do. I haven’t been neglected by the critical press (thanks PW, Lambda, and CBC!), but it’s incredible to be at a convention and what male shopper’s eyes gloss entirely over my books simply because I, a girl, am sitting behind the table. When I take a break from my merch table and ask a male friend to watch my stuff, my sales inevitably go up.
 Shortly after Triptych was published, I got an email inviting “Jim Frey” to do an interview with a media outlet I won’t name. I often get called “Jim” in emails, because it looks a lot like “J.M.” with a quick glance.  I replied, saying I would be delighted, and sent along my media-kit PDF, where the interviewer could find a bio, my bibliography and filmography, etc. Including my photo. Generally I find interviewers like to have a foundation of research, so I put that page together to make it easy for them. I signed it “J.M.”
 When I arrived at said outlet to do the interview, I was shown in, my hand shaken by the interviewer, and he said: “So, you’re Jim’s assistant then? Is he on his way?”
 I stopped, stunned, and said. “Jim? Who’s Jim?” (Having forgotten that I’d been addressed as such in the email)
 “Jim Frey?” the interviewer said.
 “J.M. Frey,” I corrected. “Jessica Marie. That’s me.”
 The interviewer was stunned. “You’re a girl?”
 I couldn’t help the scowl. “I’m a woman, and yes. I did send you my media package.”
 He made some noises when I assumed meant he couldn’t be bothered to read it. As you can guess, it wasn’t a very good interview. He had no idea what to ask me, and in fact had no clue about my work or my history as an academic. I didn’t enjoy myself, he was clearly unhappy I wasn’t who he thought I was, and I have never actually seen anything come of it.
 And would he have asked me to the interview if he had realized I was female? Probably not.  As bummed as I am that it was a missed marketing opportunity, I’m more peeved because I realized that this interviewer was glossing over what was probably hundreds of fantastic writers just because they’re female.
 Needless to say I mentioned James Tiptree Jr and George Sand as often as I could.
 Rewinding a bit:
 A few days before I had to turn in my decision on what name was going to be on the cover of Triptych, I was browsing the aisles of a big-chain book store, trying to get a sense of what sorts of ways people were titling themselves. I had done a few things (publications and film credits) as J.M. Frey because I felt “Jessica” was just a little too Sweet Valley High to really fit the brand I was trying to build with my work. But for my debut novel, did I want my full name on the cover?
 I eavesdropped on a pair of guys, completely in my target demographic, as they browsed the aisle a few feet away from me. My choice to remain “J.M. Frey” was made when I overheard one of the guys say, “Oh, this looks interesting. Read this back cover. Nice blurb from… oh. It was written by a chick. Never mind.”
 My photo is also not on the novel for the same reason.
 I have it on my website, because I figure by the time a reader is invested enough to search me on the internet, they won’t care about my gender, just about my writing. But for the people just browsing the book shelves, it matters.
 And the thing is?
 It shouldn’t. What’s between the covers should matter to a reader, not what’s between my legs.

What’s between the covers should matter to a reader, not what’s between my legs.”

geekgirlvideo:

As a follow up to the Doubleclick’s powerful “Nothing to Prove”, I wanted to talk a bit about the sign I submitted (1:40).

 Firstly, I like both this song and video not because they are “anti-“ or “against” this fake geek girl nonsense, but because the whole song and vibe of the video are more of a Oh, c’mon. Give your head a shake. You’re being so silly. It’s not a push back, or an attack, or a scream so much as it’s a palm to the forehead and raised eyebrow and a “Did that really just come out of your mouth? Really? ‘Fake Geek Girls’? Do you maybe wanna… think about what you just said?”

 Secondly, my sign:

 “I have to use a gender-neutral pen name to be respected.”

 So here’s the story: I’m a science fiction and fantasy author. Most people automatically assume that as a Caucasian female (cis-female, identifying/presenting female, bisexual) writer, that means I write Middle Grade or Young Adult fiction. When they learn that I generally write for the Adult market they assume Romance or Erotica. When I write genre books, then the next assumption is Urban Fantasy, Dystopian, or Magical Fantasy – fairies, princesses, dragons, like that.

 When I explain that no, I write Science Fiction mostly, the next reaction is usually “Oh, but that fluff stuff, right, no real science?”

 Which… WTF?

 What, I can’t science because I’m a girl?

 Leaving aside the fact that no, actually, I don’t write a lot of hard science fiction because I find the science-telling often gets in the way of the story-telling. (That’s not to say that what science I do include in my books isn’t rigorously researched. I have a military advisor, a historical architecture advisor, two historians, an ex-military dude, a NASA physicist, a biologist, and a poisons expert in my roster.) But the implication is there:

 I’m a girl and therefore I can’t science.

 (People often conveniently forget writers like Julie Czerneda, a bonefide biologist, or Erin Bow who worked at CERN.)

 The implication of these conversations is that I’m a girl and therefore I have to write books for kids about princesses getting rescued, and unicorns, and fairies with rainbow wings that vomit bubbles. Or ‘trashy’ romance books. (Which… I hate that stereotype. Romance books are never trashy or worthless.)

 Now, there are lots of lovely MG, YA, NA, Romance, Erotica, Urban Fantasy, Dystopian, Magical Fantasy writers out there of all genders and sexual inclinations –I’m not harping on those writers. They write what they enjoy, I write what I enjoy, and it’s okay! I prefer to write Social Science Fiction. What I’m harping on is the assumption that I can’t write “real” science fiction because I have ladyparts. (Instead of getting into the false assumption that “Accurate” = “hard” = “good” science fiction writing, I’ll just link you to my article on such.)

 And that assumption also ends up playing out in such a way that female science fiction writers just don’t get the respect from the readers that male ones do. I haven’t been neglected by the critical press (thanks PW, Lambda, and CBC!), but it’s incredible to be at a convention and what male shopper’s eyes gloss entirely over my books simply because I, a girl, am sitting behind the table. When I take a break from my merch table and ask a male friend to watch my stuff, my sales inevitably go up.

 Shortly after Triptych was published, I got an email inviting “Jim Frey” to do an interview with a media outlet I won’t name. I often get called “Jim” in emails, because it looks a lot like “J.M.” with a quick glance.  I replied, saying I would be delighted, and sent along my media-kit PDF, where the interviewer could find a bio, my bibliography and filmography, etc. Including my photo. Generally I find interviewers like to have a foundation of research, so I put that page together to make it easy for them. I signed it “J.M.”

 When I arrived at said outlet to do the interview, I was shown in, my hand shaken by the interviewer, and he said: “So, you’re Jim’s assistant then? Is he on his way?”

 I stopped, stunned, and said. “Jim? Who’s Jim?” (Having forgotten that I’d been addressed as such in the email)

 “Jim Frey?” the interviewer said.

 “J.M. Frey,” I corrected. “Jessica Marie. That’s me.”

 The interviewer was stunned. “You’re a girl?”

 I couldn’t help the scowl. “I’m a woman, and yes. I did send you my media package.”

 He made some noises when I assumed meant he couldn’t be bothered to read it. As you can guess, it wasn’t a very good interview. He had no idea what to ask me, and in fact had no clue about my work or my history as an academic. I didn’t enjoy myself, he was clearly unhappy I wasn’t who he thought I was, and I have never actually seen anything come of it.

 And would he have asked me to the interview if he had realized I was female? Probably not.  As bummed as I am that it was a missed marketing opportunity, I’m more peeved because I realized that this interviewer was glossing over what was probably hundreds of fantastic writers just because they’re female.

 Needless to say I mentioned James Tiptree Jr and George Sand as often as I could.

 Rewinding a bit:

 A few days before I had to turn in my decision on what name was going to be on the cover of Triptych, I was browsing the aisles of a big-chain book store, trying to get a sense of what sorts of ways people were titling themselves. I had done a few things (publications and film credits) as J.M. Frey because I felt “Jessica” was just a little too Sweet Valley High to really fit the brand I was trying to build with my work. But for my debut novel, did I want my full name on the cover?

 I eavesdropped on a pair of guys, completely in my target demographic, as they browsed the aisle a few feet away from me. My choice to remain “J.M. Frey” was made when I overheard one of the guys say, “Oh, this looks interesting. Read this back cover. Nice blurb from… oh. It was written by a chick. Never mind.”

 My photo is also not on the novel for the same reason.

 I have it on my website, because I figure by the time a reader is invested enough to search me on the internet, they won’t care about my gender, just about my writing. But for the people just browsing the book shelves, it matters.

 And the thing is?

 It shouldn’t. What’s between the covers should matter to a reader, not what’s between my legs.

(via themarysue)

Source: geekgirlvideo
Half-gnoll, half kender. 
All dead as soon as the paladin’s back is turned.
noobtheloser:

"Why does he talk like that?"
"He hasn’t spoken normally since his village was burned and his wife and children slaughtered by bandits."Such tragic. Very backstory. Wow.

Half-gnoll, half kender. 

All dead as soon as the paladin’s back is turned.

noobtheloser:

"Why does he talk like that?"

"He hasn’t spoken normally since his village was burned and his wife and children slaughtered by bandits."

Such tragic. Very backstory. Wow.

Source: noobtheloser

"

What To Do When Your Boyfriend’s Asshole Best Friend Says, “Hey, Never Trust Anything That Bleeds For Seven Days And Doesn’t Die,
Right?”
OR The Only Poem I’ll Ever Write About Periods.

Don’t excuse him because he’s had
at least three lite beers
and is sweating through his black button down
that his mom or exgirlfriend
probably bought him.
Don’t excuse him because he’s been turned down
by the last six girls he went on dates with
after meeting them on tindr
with a picture that’s seven years old
Don’t excuse him because
he’s usually such a nice guy
because you don’t want to be a bitch
because you don’t want to cause a scene
because when you were seventeen
your sister told you
no one likes an angry feminist

Tell him,
Hey, Asshole:
Let me explain something to you.
Every goddamn motherfucking month since I was eleven,
a part of me
tore itself to shreds
ripped itself apart inside me
and then remade itself.

So yes, I bleed for seven days
and I don’t die
You know what else can do that?
Gods.
Immortal beings.
Things of legend.
Fuck, I can even
create life.

So I say, never trust anything that can’t
bleed for seven days and not die.
You know what that makes it?
Weak
Fallible
Mortal.
So let’s see, hon,
What you’re made of.
If you can bleed for seven days
and not die.

Rip out his jugular with your teeth.
And when he bleeds for seven seconds
and dies,
spit on his corpse and say,
I thought not.

"

— By Katherine Tucker (determined-in-slc)

Trust Anything that Bleeds and Does Not Die
Source: determined-in-slc
baretobush:

Sexual Gratification and My PicturesThere is a common question I get that goes something like this: "Don’t you find it disturbing that there are people out there who masturbate to your pictures?"And the short answer is no, no I don’t. I do not create my images for the purpose of being used for sexual gratification, that is true. But does that mean I am offended, hurt, disgusted, or creeped out when they are used as such? Absolutely not. There is a simple truth to the release and distribution of creative work and that is that once you put it out there, it’s out there and you have essentially given up your creative control. When I give you a picture of my body, it doesn’t come with a legal contract saying that you will use it only and entirely for educational purposes and never pursue any sort of sexual arousal from it. Though I may give it to you because I want to tell you something - I want to share a story about something - what you choose to do with it is ultimately your choice alone and it’s out of my hands. Put it on the fridge next to a picture of your childhood best friend or jack off to it before you go to work. Once I give my creation to the world I relinquish my control and regardless of my purpose or intent, your interpretation is yours and yours alone.I am fully aware that my pictures can be perceived as sexual. I’m sharing intimate, graphic pictures of my body with the internet into a community already teeming with sex. I also don’t feel that it’s necessarily a bad thing if they’re perceived as such. Sex and education are not mutually exclusive. Arousal and appreciation can go hand in hand. An appreciation for what I say tangled with an inexplicable desire to fuck me do not have to be at odds with each other. Sexual arousal is not a sin or a threat or a slap in the face of my purpose. Sexual arousal is human, it’s natural, it’s going to happen no matter what I do and I don’t view that as a bad thing. The world of human perception and interpretation are so wonderful, incredible and complicated that there are undoubtedly people out there who fantasize about licking the period blood from my legs while others fantasize about being my best friend and having a chat over coffee from viewing the same exact image.Sexuality isn’t evil. Seeing sex within something does not mean that thing is dirty, compromised, wrong or distasteful. Sexuality can live within things, it doesn’t have to be an either/or. Because I share my body with you for the purpose of sharing my stories and my views does not mean that I am upset if your view of my creation becomes saturated with sexual gratification. I don’t feel upset or dirty or disgusted. I don’t feel that compromises or cheapens my intent. The idea that sexuality is so demonized and that people need to remove all of those thoughts from their head to appreciate what I’m saying is simply bizarre. I’m a beautiful woman sharing intimate and naked photos of myself on the internet and to assume that people won’t find arousal and sexual appeal in that is simply naive. I am comfortable with the knowledge that there are people out there who masturbate to my images in the same way that I’m comfortable with the knowledge that there are people out there who cry when they read the story that accompanies them. There are people out there who are upset by what I do, who love what I do, who don’t give a damn about what I do and who are aroused by what I do. In my humble opinion, not one of those reactions is evil, wrong, disgusting, immoral or a reflection on me having done a poor job on my end. They are all valid, complicated, intertwined human emotions and I feel no shame in being a catalyst for their release.
- http://www.baretobush.com/sexual-gratification/

baretobush:

Sexual Gratification and My Pictures

There is a common question I get that goes something like this:

"Don’t you find it disturbing that there are people out there who masturbate to your pictures?"

And the short answer is no, no I don’t. I do not create my images for the purpose of being used for sexual gratification, that is true. But does that mean I am offended, hurt, disgusted, or creeped out when they are used as such? Absolutely not. There is a simple truth to the release and distribution of creative work and that is that once you put it out there, it’s out there and you have essentially given up your creative control. When I give you a picture of my body, it doesn’t come with a legal contract saying that you will use it only and entirely for educational purposes and never pursue any sort of sexual arousal from it. Though I may give it to you because I want to tell you something - I want to share a story about something - what you choose to do with it is ultimately your choice alone and it’s out of my hands. Put it on the fridge next to a picture of your childhood best friend or jack off to it before you go to work. Once I give my creation to the world I relinquish my control and regardless of my purpose or intent, your interpretation is yours and yours alone.

I am fully aware that my pictures can be perceived as sexual. I’m sharing intimate, graphic pictures of my body with the internet into a community already teeming with sex. I also don’t feel that it’s necessarily a bad thing if they’re perceived as such. Sex and education are not mutually exclusive. Arousal and appreciation can go hand in hand. An appreciation for what I say tangled with an inexplicable desire to fuck me do not have to be at odds with each other. Sexual arousal is not a sin or a threat or a slap in the face of my purpose. Sexual arousal is human, it’s natural, it’s going to happen no matter what I do and I don’t view that as a bad thing. The world of human perception and interpretation are so wonderful, incredible and complicated that there are undoubtedly people out there who fantasize about licking the period blood from my legs while others fantasize about being my best friend and having a chat over coffee from viewing the same exact image.

Sexuality isn’t evil. Seeing sex within something does not mean that thing is dirty, compromised, wrong or distasteful. Sexuality can live within things, it doesn’t have to be an either/or. Because I share my body with you for the purpose of sharing my stories and my views does not mean that I am upset if your view of my creation becomes saturated with sexual gratification. I don’t feel upset or dirty or disgusted. I don’t feel that compromises or cheapens my intent. The idea that sexuality is so demonized and that people need to remove all of those thoughts from their head to appreciate what I’m saying is simply bizarre. I’m a beautiful woman sharing intimate and naked photos of myself on the internet and to assume that people won’t find arousal and sexual appeal in that is simply naive.

I am comfortable with the knowledge that there are people out there who masturbate to my images in the same way that I’m comfortable with the knowledge that there are people out there who cry when they read the story that accompanies them. There are people out there who are upset by what I do, who love what I do, who don’t give a damn about what I do and who are aroused by what I do. In my humble opinion, not one of those reactions is evil, wrong, disgusting, immoral or a reflection on me having done a poor job on my end. They are all valid, complicated, intertwined human emotions and I feel no shame in being a catalyst for their release.

- http://www.baretobush.com/sexual-gratification/

Source: baretobush